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support the inflammatory flames heard on the floor of the u.s. senate used to block a u.n. treaty. a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the world. hundreds of millions. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute. some had signaled support for the treaty and then indicated they'd vote for it only to vote against it. one of the measure's co-sponsored, jerry mirrand, actually voted against it. so the guy who co-sponsored it voted against it. we asked him to come on the program yesterday, today as well. he declined. a former senator got involved on this as
night. that's it for us tonight. "ac 360" starts right now. >>> i'm atika shubert. we . we have breaking news coming in to us. according to the u.s. geological survey, a magnitude 7.3 magnitude earthquake strug off the coast of japan. a tsunami warning has been issued. i know it was felt very strongly there, alex. what can you tell us? >> well, atika, you mentioned some of the details. we were sitting in the office here in our bureau in tokyo, up on the ninth floor of this building. it's hard to describe, you can't really describe the feeling until you're into it. the one thing that grips me, i'm relatively new to living here in japan is the noise more than everything. everything basically shaking violently, our filing cabinets shaking. here's what i can tell you. you mentioned the 7.3 earthquake. a few other details just coming in. there are advisories -- pardon me, i'm looking off my notes. there are advisories for japan, but the pacific tsunami warning center has not issued a further alert beyond that. right now they're keeping it just to japan. we are hearing reports of possibly as m
dignity and grace. that's all for us tonigh> that's all for us tonigh> that's all for us tonight. >>> good evening, again, everyone. we're here live at the town hall in newtown, connecticut. it has become for all the wrong reasons main street usa. that may all change. plenty of news on that subject tonight with president obama laying out a plan of action today an the national rifle association planning to speak on that later this week. for now, people here are focused firmly on the moment, not each living day by day, but for the survivors, the families living hour by hour, minute by minute, second by second even. they are tending to the heart wrenching duty they have to bury the dead, and the duty we all have to remember and honor. daniel barden was just seven but called the spark of his family. always smiling. and had two front teeth missing. daniel's dad is a musician, and daniel followed his lead by playing the drums in a mini band he formed with his older brother and sister. his family describes daniel as a thoughtful and affectionate boy. whenever he saw kids sitting alone in the lunc
to show the pictures of daniel who wanted to be a firefighter when he grew up. people supported us after 9/11 we are here to rueturn the favo. we saw a photograph the class photo of lauren russos first graders who were killed on friday. this was grace mcdonald's class. she and 14 other kids, even as a little girl she knew she wanted to become a teacher. on friday she was where she wanted to be. filling in for a teacher on maternm maternity leave. >> it says me, since i've been with you. thanks for rubbing off on me. >> 30 and in love. tony and lauren russo. >> do you you remember the moment you realized you were in love with her? >> yes, the first date, i had with her i knew. >> at a wine bar where they shared her first kiss. she called him lovy. and she didn't like to honk her horn at people who cut her off in traffic. >> she liked to send him cards like this one. >> this card made me giggle and think of you very appropriate just bananas. >> these photographs taken two months before she died. >> this was a first one where i don't have a funny face. >> they celebrated one year of dating in
's cory booker tomorrow night. it should be fascinating. that's it for us tonight. "ac 360" starts now. not trying to take sides. our goal is real reporting, finding out the truth. all calls out hip pock see. this is a baffling case of flip-flopping. this is a story we reported last night and is stranger the more we look into it. it's a long story, but stay with us. on tuesday the senate rejected a u.n. treaty aimed at protecting the rights of disabled people around the world. 125 other countries ratified this, but in the full senate 38 republicans voted no leaving the treaty five votes short of ratification. what we learned today that's interesting is some of these same senators actually supported the treaty before they voted against it. some even pledged their support very publicly. senator roy blunt of missouri was a flip-flopper and kay bailey hutchinson of texas and senator jerry moran of kansas. we asked them all to come on the program and they declined. they're silent on this. senator moran was a co-sponsor of the measure to ratify the treaty. he even put a press release back in
that might support the inflammatory claims heard on the floor of the u.s. senate that were used to block a u.n. treaty, a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the entire world. now, the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities and it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. now, the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans or vets who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the treaty. 125 countries ratified the treaty but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republicans, senators, voted against it. their names right there on the right of the screen. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute, some senators had actually signaled support for the treaty, then indicated that they would vote for it only to vote against it. one of the actual measures co-sponsors of it, he actually voted against it. one of the co-sponsors. amazing. he voted against the bill he had co-sponsored. we asked him to c
heroes sometimes ♪ >> reporter: kareen wynter, cnn, los angeles. >>> that's all for us tonight. "ac 360" starts now. >>> good evening. it's 10:00. we begin as we do every night, keeping them honest. our goal is just reporting. finding the truth, looking for facts. for two nights, we've been looking for any fact a single shred of evidence that might support the inflammatory flames heard on the floor of the u.s. senate used to block a u.n. treaty. a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the world. hundreds of millions. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute.
. that's all for us tonight. we are once again in the old town hall in newtown connecticut. it's become for all the wrong reasons, main street usa. that may change. may yet become the road to a new consensus on preventing the next deadly outbreak of gun violence. plenty of news on that subject tonight with president obama laying out a plan of action today and the nra planning to speak on that later this week. for now, though, fell of this -- people focus onned on the moment. not living day by day, but for the families living in some case, hour by hour, minute by minute, second by second even. they are tending to the sadly duty they have to bury the dead and to the duty we all have to honor and to remember. daniel barden was just 7, always smiling, had two front teeth missing, which his parents say he earned in his fearless pursuit of fun and happiness. his dad was a musician and he followed his lead by playing the drums. in a mini band he forms with his older brother and sister. his family described him as a thoughtful and affectionate boy. whenever he noticed kids sitting alone in the
's all for us tonight. >>> piers, thanks very much. we are once again in the old town hall in newtown connecticut. it's become for all the wrong reasons, main street usa. that may change. plenty of news on that subject tonight with president obama laying out a plan of action today and the nra planning to speak on that later this week. for now, though, fell of this town are focusing on the moment. they're not even focusing on the day but minute by minute. they are tending to the sadly duty they have to bury the dead and to remember and to honor. daniel barden was always smiling and had two front teeth missing. which his parents say he earned in his fearless pursuit of fun and happiness. his dad was a musician and he followed his lead by playing the drums. his family described him as a thoughtful and affectionate boy. whenever he noticed kids sitting alone in the runch room at school, he would join them. in an interview, his dad remembers teaching him to play "jingle bells" on the way to school. >> we held hands on the way to the bus. and that was our last morning together. he did get u
" character. alec baldwin live tomorrow night. that's all for us tonight. "ac 360" starts now. >>> good evening. it's 10:00 on the east coast and we begin with brooking news on the looming fiscal cliff. and signs of a potential fall. for the past few nights we've been telling you about the frustrating lack of progress to avert a deal on automatic tax hikes and spending cuts that kick in less than four weeks from now. poll after poll shows the american people want compromise. but there weren't many signs that was going to happen, nothing was getting done. in a cnn/crc poll, 67% said washington officials would behave like spoiled children in the fiscal cliff discussions. only 28% said they would behave like responsible adults. tonight, signs that maybe some adult behavior might be prevail. and a compromise might be reached. joining me now, dana bash, jessica yellin, and david gergen. what's the latest? >> reporter: they are a long way from a deal. but late today speaker boehner and president obama did speak to one another on the phone. now, this is an important development because it's th
. the threats that missiles pose the united states. tonight the story struck a chord with us. anderson starts now. >> good evening. we begin tonight with the looming fiscal cliff. >> tonight, there are signs that maybe, some responsible adult became may prevail. joining me now, what is the latest what are you hearing? >> they are a long way from a deal. they did speak to each other on the phone. this is the first time they talked in a week. i'm told though, that there is no real progress in the negotiations. as you know, president obama insi insists there is no deal to present on the top 2% of earners. >> it doesn't involve the rates going up on the top 2%. all of those americans too get a tax cut on that finramework. in some sense it is a tax cut for all americans. >> bottom line, we are talking today but we are still at stalemate. a phone call is big news between these two. >> we are hearing about senate republicans, what are you hearing, how significant is it. it is significant for a couple of reasons. these three republicans in different ways suggested that they would be okay with what mo
. stay with me. it is basically weird. on tuesday, the senate rejected a u.s. treaty aimed at protecting the rights of disabled people around the world. it is modeled on the americans for disability act. 125 other countries ratified it but in the full senate 38 republicans voted no leaving it 5 votes short of ratification. what we learned today is that some of the very same senators actually supported the treaty before they voted against it. some even pledged their support publicly. senator roy blunt of missouri was a flip flopper and kay bailey hutchison and jerry moran of kansas. they all declined to come on the program. they're silent. senator moran was a cosponsor of the measure to ratify the treaty and put a press release back in may proclaiming support for the treaty. i want to show you something else. here's senator moran with former senator bob dole in june. dole, a war veteran, a listening time supporter of disability rights and advocate of this treaty. just before tuesday's vote, he came to the senate chamber, 89, frail in the wheelchair and thought it was that important to be
for us right now. "ac 360" starts right now. >> piers, thanks. good evening, everyone. we begin as we do every night, keeping them honest. looking for facts, not supporting democrats or republicans. our goal is just report, finding the facts, finding the truth. we did that last week. again, the more we look into it, the more we find people in powerful and influential places saying things that just don't square with the facts. it's about a u.n. treaty that failed to be ratified by the senate. a treaty that was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on equal rights of the disabled. if other countries adopted better treatment of their disabled citizens, the idea is that disabled americans who visit or live in other countries would also benefit. 125 countries ratified the treaty. it was supported by george bush, signed by the current president, and has support from both sides of the aisle like john mccain and bob dole himself a world war ii veteran. he was wheeled onto the senate floor, you can see, for the vote he hoped to see the treaty ratified. instead after pressure
somebody rather than run away. i appreciate you being with us. thank you for taking the time to be with us. i'm glad you and your family are safe. >> you are welcome. >> i'm joined by lou palumbo, director of elite intelligence and protection group. at this point, it seems clearly one shooter, multiple gunshots. the shooter killed by a self inflicted gunshot wound. sounds like the person he saw was one of the people who died. what do you make of what you heard? >> well, you know, an incident similar to one in aurora and virginia tech, similar to one in texas a&m and, you know, just mentally defective people who have the ability to obtain firearms they shouldn't be able to obtain and using them as a vehicle to express disdain. >> we don't know the motive or if there was a target this person had, if they were a disgruntled employee or what the motive may have been. we will have to wait and see on. that we are joined by two people who saw the kimmer just before he opened fire. thank you for joining us. megan, what did you see? >> jenna and i walked to the restroom after we walk in to nordstro
korea. tonight, a u.s. official tells cnn, there are early signs the koreans are not in total control of the device. but a north korean government-run tv, the news anchor was giddy with excitement. keeping them honest. pyongyang reportedly spent more than $1 billion on their missile program this year alone, money they could feed a lot of hungry, starving people in north korea. but while much of the world is talking about missiles tonight, there is a crime against humety occurring in that country. a crime that receives very little attention. as i said, some 150,000 people are believed to be doing hard labor on the brink of starvation, in a network of hidden gulags. it doesn't house just those who have been accused of political crimes, however. these prisons house their entire families, grandparents, parents, children. it's a system called three generations of punishment. imagine if you were accused of a crime and sent to a concentration camp. but to truly punish you, they would send your parents and your children. three generations of your family simply disappeared. the most notorious
former football player here. he's used to wrangling people together. all the kids have been together since young children. they canceled their plans to meet for a holiday celebration in new york city, every single one of them came homestead. >> we've all been such good friends such a long time. we all grew up here. and it's so close-knit, this community. everyone kind of has each other's backs and does whatever it can to help each other out. >> we will be leaving newtown to give this small town its streets back. for the residents here to grieve and share together. but we're not going to stop covering this and talking tab in honor of those who died and to make those in power take action to stop anything like this from happening again. "a.c. 360" begins now. >> erin, thanks very much. good evening, everyone. we are live once again from newtown, connecticut. a town where many students returned to school today. schools reopened, of course, with the exception of sandy hook elementary, the school that's now a crime scene. the students of sandy hook will go back to school after the holidays
by the senate. a treaty that was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on equal rights of the disabled. if other countries adopted better treatment of their disabled citizens, the idea is that disabled americans who visit or live in other countries would also benefit. 125 countries ratified the treaty. it was supported by george bush, signed by the current president, and has support from both sides of the aisle like john mccain and past republican leaders like bob dole, himself a world war ii veteran. he was wheeled onto the senate floor, you can see, for the vote he hoped to see the treaty ratified. instead after pressure from special interest groups, 38 republicans some vowing to support the treaty voted no. one of the loudest critics was the home school legal defense association, the hslda. it's a powerful lob by whose leader you're about to meet. they had some very strong things to say about the treaty, but the notion was basically this. if it were to pass, they said, the u.n. treaty would somehow let the u.n. mandate how parents of disabled kids in america cared fo
, basketball, arm wrestling but he especially loved swimming. his parents used to say he swam like a fish. and loved to visit his grandparents. james also loved to ride his bike. he loved to use hair gel in order to spike up his brown hair. he was a little boy who looked forward to growing up. he liked to sing at the top of his lungs and would ask how old do i have to be before i can sing on a stage? he also wanted to know when he'd be old enough to order a foot long ham sandwich at subway one of his favorite places. james was born four weeks prematurely, his family used to joke, he came into the world because he was hungry. he was an early riser, always eager to start the day. at the end of the day, he loved nothing more than to cuddle up with his mom under a blanket on the couch. james also adored spending time with his dad. in his obituary, his family writes, if dad was outside, james liked to be right there with him. their love was one of a kind. james was his dad's mini look-alike. jessica rekos loved everything about horses. she'd spend her free time reading books about them. drawin
. barbara starr will be with us about that. thanks for joining us. "ac 360" starts now. >>> we begin with breaking news. new signs tonight the syrian government could be preparing to do the unthinkable, unleash chemical weapons on its own people. the united states has new intelligence suggesting syrian forces now mixing the ingredients used to make deadly serin gas. a serious civil war has progressed. the obama administration has repeatedly warned even just moving chemical weapons would be a red line that could draw a swift response. just hours ago, president obama directly addressing the assad regime about this latest intelligence. >> today, i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable, and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> the world of course has been watching in horror at the atrocities committed by the syrian government. that's why this fear of chemical weapons is so real tonight. w
's tomorrow, that's all for us. ac 360 starts now. a lawmaker talks about what they want and what happens when they don't get what they want. she followed the letter that pays the price for only being 98% loyal. the nra speaks out tomorrow in washington. we honor the lives that were remembered there that day. jesse lewis couldn't wait to get to school that friday. he was excited for the holidays and his dad was going to join him in the class that afternoon to make gingerbread houses. he was 6 years old. smart, passionate beyond his years, his dad thought jesse could concur the world. he died trying to lead others to safety after hearing gunshots in the hallway. that's how he led his life, his parents say, fearless, courage, and full of strength about jesse loved animals and was learning to ride horses. his favorite toy was a little soldier. almost every night of his life, jesse slept in his mother's arms. his family writes, the picture that remains etched in our souls is his in his boots, ripped jeans and t-shirt, chomping through the pasture on his way from one adventure to another. catherine
community. we can change all the lives of these wounded warriors. we owe it to them. >> that's all for us tonight. "ac 360" starts now. >>> thanks, piers. it's 10:00 p.m. on the east coast. we begin tonight as anderson always does, keeping them honest. not taking sides or playing favorites, you can get that other places. we're interested in the facts. they do exist and our goal is to bring them to you so tonight, a keeping them honest investigation about a city that is among the nation's deadliest. chicago, illinois. this week alone, six people have been killed there, including a 15-year-old girl who was just standing in her backyard with her friends. those deaths bring the total number of murders there this year to 476. that just happens to be a number that is greater than the coalition troops serving in afghanistan during the very same period, so think of that. chicago is in a very real sense a war zone. >> patients keep coming and they come and they come, like machine gunfire. you can expect this to happen every single night. >> for the past several years, "360" has been covering the g
of four americans in libya. she's the one, you'll recall, the president stood up using some pretty blunt language, saying that anyone who's got a problem with her has a problem with him. instead, there won't be a confrontation because late today, ambassador rice took herself out of contention, writing the president she's honored to be considered for the office, writing "i am fully confident that i could serve our country ably and effectively in that role. however, if nominated, i am now convinced that the confirmation process would be lengthy, disruptive and costly. that trade-off is simply not worth it for our country." >> i made the decision that it was the best thing for our country, for the american people that i not continue to be considered by the president for nomination as secretary of state, because i didn't want to see a confirmation process that was very prolonged, very politicized, very distracting and very disruptive, because there are so many things we need to get done as a country, and the first several months of a second-term president's agenda is really the opportunity t
of newtown trying to come to grips with what has happened. just behind us this morning. right now, right now, this is still an active crime scene that means many of the bodies are lying where they fell inside the school, including the body of a killer. we want to at least tell you his name. and as anderson, we won't be repeating it much tonight at all. 20 years old. his mother taught at the school. she was found dead at the family home. unclear exactly how she died or when she died. >> soledad, the idea that those kids are still in the school, i mean, it is such a horrific image to think about tonight, and for the parents, not to be able to see their children yet. >> yeah, the police say it's an active crime scene and they told us they thought by sunday, they would be able to have the crime scene part of it and the investigation at least that portion of the wrapped up. but now we're getting told that actually it might be even as soon as tomorrow morning. but as you can imagine, knowing your child has perished inside that school and you can't even go and get the body, it would be a horrific t
we were covering the shooting in newtown, connecticut, anderson learned something that made us all sick to our stomach that people were trying to capitalize on the tragedy, fraudulently trying to capitalize on the victims' family families. tonight a woman has been arrested in connection with one of those alleged scams. drew will join me with the details in a moment. first here's how we got to this point. last week the uncle of 6-year-old noah told anderson there were fake web site, facebook pages and e-mails going around asking for donations in noah's name. drew griffin and david fitzpatrick, our produce, tracked one of those e-mails to the bronx, and her name is noah alba, and they went to her house. here is what happened next. >> hi. are you ms. alba? you set up donations on behalf of the newtown tragedy? >> no. >> here is your name and address on the e-mail. >> no, i will show you who i am. >> can i come in with the camera crew? >> no. >> alba eventually agreed to let her voice be recorded and denied she had anything to do with the e-mail having to do with donations. this is mor
a whole lot of attention. turns out it got very specific attention from both the fbi and the u.s. district attorney in connecticut. today, noelle alba was arrested, charged with lying to federal agents who were investigating her for fraudulent fund-raising activity. here you see her leaving court in hartford, connecticut. she was released on $50,000 bond. if she is convicted, she could face up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. the fbi's criminal complaint refers to the reporting we did last week, saying quote, on or about december 19th, 2012, cnn's anderson cooper 360 program broadcast a story regarding charity scams and the sandy hook tragedy. alba was a subject of the program and allowed the cnn crew to record her audio voice in response to questions about her involvement with charities to help sandy hook victims. alba claimed that the paypal account listed in the request for donations was not hers, only that she had an account like that. alba claimed she never set up any funds for anybody. the journalist reported that alba claimed she immediately refunded all of the donations
. which brings us to tonight's report. with killings on the rise, illinois's governor, pat quinn, launched an ambitious anti-violence program two years ago called the neighborhood recovery initiative. on paper it sounded like a great idea and it really did catch our eye. and then we investigated and the cnn investigation found some pretty serious questions about whether this was crime prevention or good old-fashioned politics. here's investigative correspondent drew griffin. >> reporter: hello? hello? anybody here? this is one of the community organizing groups hired to help reduce violence in chicago. part of a $54.5 million initiative, governor pat quinn's neighborhood recovery initiative or nri, rolled out just before his contentious 2010 election. this group, called the woodlawn organization, got $1.2 million. >> so this is all that's left of the woodlawn organization. we walked through a front door that was wide open. you can see the equipment is here. this was defunded by the program because they couldn't figure out what they had done with the money. >> reporter: it was one of about
the camp. >> you thought everybody lived in a prison camp like this? >> translator: yes. >> shin told us this was the house where he was born. his mother and father were prisoners whose marriage, if you could call it that, was arranged by the guards as a reward for hard work. >> did they live together? did they see each other every day? >> translator: no. you can't live together. only when they worked hard could they be together. >> did they love each other? >> translator: i don't know. in my eyes, we were not a family. we were just prisoners. >> how do you mean? >> translator: you wear what you're given, you eat what you're given, and you only do what you're told to do. so there's nothing that the parent can do for you and there's nothing that the children can do for their parents. >> this may be a very dumb question, but did you even know what love was when you were for the first 23 years of your life? >> translator: i still don't know what that means. >> love may have been absent but fear was not. in this building, a school of sorts, shin says he watched his teacher beat a little girl
diplomats who do work overseas, wonderful work, and maybe it's time for us to decide what we think an ambassador really should be. is it a position designed to represent american interests around the world by a skilled diplomat? or is it just a great way to say thank you to our friends? thanks for joining us. tomorrow on "outfront" amy copeland. we are so excited for this. you will recall the college student who struggled with a flesh-eating bacteria. we have been following her recovery. it's been miraculous. she joins us tomorrow. "anderson" starts now. >>> good evening, everyone. we begin tonight as we do every night, keeping them honest. looking for facts, not offering opinions or playing favorites. we're not supporting democrats or republicans. you can find that on other cable channels. our goal is just reporting, real reporting, trying to find the facts and the truth. calling out hypocrisy. tonight we are one day closer to the fiscal cliff and not one iota closer to a deal to avoid it. now, on january 1st, four weeks from today, automatic tax hikes and spending cuts kick in wi
. a voice to tell us about their children, how special they were, the lives they lived. we don't want to just focus on how they die. we want to focus on how they lived and the lives they touched and they have touched so many lives. we'll hear from the mcdonnell family who graciously invited us into their home to tell us about their bright, talented 7-year-old daughter grace. grace was laid to rest today. her funeral today. there were also funerals for olivia and for dylan and for mary and for rachel. we remember them all. dylan hockley moved to newtown from england just two years ago. he was 6 yearsoles old. a special needs child, his parents chose this community for the good reputation of the sandy hook elementary school. dylan flourished at sandy hook thanks in large part to his special education teacher anne marie murphy who works with him one-on-one. the houckleys kept a picture of ann marie rr on their fridge, and he would point to it every day. on friday, he died in her arms as she tried to shield him. his parents say they take great comfort in knowing he wasn't alone when he di
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 92 (some duplicates have been removed)